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Centre for Research on Social Inclusion

Migration, Multiculturalism and Nation

Dubai

Constructing regionally appropriate anti-racism strategies for Australia

A/Prof KM Dunn; Dr A Pedersen; A/Prof J Forrest; Dr YC Paradies; A/Prof DF Ip; Prof H Babacan

Racism is an international social scourge, and Australia is not immune from its injurious effects. The experience of racism degrades senses of belonging and generates disaffection, leads to ill-health and restrictions of mobility, as well as other social and individual pathologies. Reducing racism will strengthen Australia's social fabric. This project tests the utility of anti-racism templates and does so in rural as well as urban Australia. The templates will be usable by local authorities and NGOs in framing their anti-racism efforts.

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Tibetan Mentoring Project

Dr Amanda Wise - Northern Sydney Central Coast Health, Northern Beaches TAFE, Manly Community Centre

This research project involves an evaluation of a new refugee settlement initiative. The program to be evaluated involves a mentoring program where twelve Tibetan refugee families are matched with Mentors living in the local area (long term Australian permanent residents or citizens). The program stems from feedback from the Tibetan families that one of the most important settlement needs they have is assistance to 'get to know the locals' and help in understanding and fitting into the local community.

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Building Neighbourhood Harmony Phase Two: Online Resource: Anti-Racism Strategies for Local Government

Dr Amanda Wise - Department of Immigration and Citizenship

This project builds on 'Phase One' of Building Neighbourhood Harmony. To enhance the ability of local governments around Australia to foster community harmony, 'Phase Two' of the project involves the development of a website resource for local councils. The website will include case studies from Phase One, up to 50 downloadable profiles of initiatives around Australia, links to resources, and a 'dos and don'ts' advice page.

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Community Harmony & Muslim-Australians: research into community based strategies to improve relations between Muslim and non-Muslim Australians

Dr Amanda Wise - Department of Immigration and Citizenship

The events of September 11, Bali, London, and more recently the Cronulla riots have created a climate of anxiety, fear and tension between Muslim and non-Muslim Australians. Local government and local grassroots organisations are well placed to play a role in fostering better relations between Muslim and non-Muslim Australians. This project involves research into initiatives which promote positive inter-religious and inter-ethnic engagement at the local level. It involves an Australia-wide audit of community based and local government activities, an international audit of best-practice, and approximately ten case studies involving interviews with participants of initiatives in Australia. Our aim is to gain insights into 'what works' and how to engage Australians not normally involved or interested in such activities.

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Cronulla Community Forum

Dr Amanda Wise - NSW Community Relations Commission

The Cronulla riots of December 2005 were a watershed for Australian multiculturalism, marking a worrying turning point in community relations in this country. Government and community groups responded by implementing numerous initiatives to deal with the causes and impacts of the riots. This project involves research with government and community organisations and groups to determine what initiatives have been implemented since December 2005, to identify successes, establish what might have been done better and highlight where the gaps are.

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Cronulla Research Database

Dr Amanda Wise - NSW Community Relations Commission

CRSI has been invited by the Community Relations Commission for a Multicultural NSW to compile a database of all research undertaken on the Cronulla riots. To access the database, click here (password required. To apply for a password, contact crsi@scmp.mq.edu.au)

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Transnational Affect and the Moral Economies of Temporary Skilled Migration of South Indians to Australia

Dr Selvaraj Velayutham & Dr Amanda Wise - ARC Discovery
This project will critically examine the experience of temporary skilled Indian migrants to Australia. It aims to develop insights into the cultural and social impacts of temporary migration from the perspective of the temporary skilled migrant, and in terms of their impact on the Australian social and cultural landscape. The research will explore in particular, how gender and temporary visa status shape their experiences of migration, decisions on settlement, family reunion, and engagement with Australian society and everyday life. The project employs 'masculinities', 'affect', 'the visa' and 'temporariness' as conceptual frames to analyse the experience from the migrant perspective of this major new shift in Australian multicultural policy. Theories of diaspora, transnationalism, embodiment, affect and gender are central.

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Building Neighbourhood Harmony Phase One : Strategies for Local Government

Dr Amanda Wise - Department of Immigration & Multicultural Affairs Living in Harmony Partnership

This partnership project explores the role of local government interventions to combat racism and improve interethnic relations at the neighbourhood level and to build sustainable 'community' across and between different ethnic communities in local contexts. It involves a number of components in partnership with three councils around Australia; Ashfield, Canning (WA), and Griffith (NSW). Extensive ethnographic and interview based research was conducted as case studies in Griffith and Canning to explore the localised dynamics of interethnic relations in those areas. In Ashfield, where preliminary fieldwork had already been conducted, the project involves trialling a number of new strategies for strengthening relations between Anglo-and non Anglo Ashfield residents. Community based reference groups were established in each of these areas to guide the research. The project also includes a national survey of local councils on the new strategies they are using to strengthen interethnic relations within their local areas. The project will result in a report and a range of intervention models suitable for deployment by councils around Australia. More...

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Comparative Ethnic Concentrations

Professor Michael Poulsen - British Academy

This project focuses on comparative research into the geography of ethnic segregation/concentration within the United Kingdom and Australia 1991-2001. There are three reasons why we undertake these studies. First, the comparative approach to the geography of segregation/concentration is important in that the differences between nations are under-researched. Secondly, those differences are important in that they allow us to achieve greater understanding of what is happening within our own countries. Thirdly, working on comparative studies allows us to operate at and network at the international level. This project has involved applying the Poulsen, Johnston and Forrest typology to classify data on census area into one of six types. Those types involve a continuum extending from "white citadels" at one end, through "areas of mix", to areas of "extreme ethnic polarisation". By applying this methodology to two censuses (1991 and 2001) we achieve a set of measures that will inform us about changes in ethnic segregation/concentration over time. Given these are the same measures in both countries we are able to undertake comparative evalations of the geography of segregation/concentration.

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Cultural Diversity, Community and Family Services: Experiences among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse parents of local early childhood services

Dr Amanda Wise; A/Prof Michael Fine; and Ms Kylie Sait - ARC Linkage

The evidence is clear that strong communities and effective early intervention strategies play a key role in preventing social disadvantage later in a child's life. Through the provision of high quality training to a doctoral student, this project will have significant benefits at many levels of policy and government. Local, state and federal governments and family service providers will have the opportunity to see the effectiveness of their services on parents over an extended period of time and to learn from the project about new strategies that may be deployed to assist culturally diverse families in their communities.

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Rural Migrant Labour in Large Chinese Cities

Dr Fei Guo - with Prof. G. Hugo, University of Adelaide and Prof. X. Yuan, Nankai University, China - ARC Discovery Grant

In recent decades there has been a surge of migration from rural to urban areas in China after a long period of suppression under the household registration system. This has been driven not only by rapid economic growth in large urban areas but also by low fertility levels in those areas leading to a decline in the native workforce growth. Without 'replacement migration' urban growth would not be sustainable and this is not sufficiently appreciated. This pioneering project investigates the nature of this migration and its drivers by linking labour market segmentation to uneven demographic changes.  It examines the urban sectors that are most dependent on migrants in four large cities and the implications for policy on internal migration.

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Geographies of racism in Australia

Professor Jim Forrest; Kevin Dunn

In 2001 a database on racist attitudes was collected, using a telephone survey (5056 sample). A key finding from the Racism project is that while racism is quite prevalent in Australian society its occurrences differ from place to place. These variations have been largely overlooked by anti-racism campaigns in Australia. The findings show that most Australians recognise that racism is a problem in society. Racist attitudes are positively associated with age, non-tertiary education, and to a slightly lesser extent with those who do not speak a language other than English, the Australia-born, and with males.

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Measuring and mapping the experience of racism in Australia

A/Prof Jim Forrest; Dr Kevin Dunn; and Dr R Pe-Pua

This is the first empirical assessment of the circumstances and frequency of the experience of racism in Australia. A telephone survey, 12000 respondents, and fieldwork in ten localities, are the major method. Spatial and social variations in the experience of racism will be analysed. Social construction theory will be tested as an explanation of such variations. Regional anti-racism packages will be developed and tested in the field. Decision-support tools for local authorities and communities to combat racism will be provided. A unique racism database will underpin a scholarly monograph, doctoral dissertation and a series of refereed articles.

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The Geography of Ethnic Group Segregation in Australia, 1966-2001

Professor Michael Poulsen

Comprehensive analysis of the nature and dynamics of ethnic group segregation and assimilation in Australian cities and non-urban areas during much of the post-WW2 period is an under-researched area. Overseas work in OECD countries indicates strengthening of structural spatial divisions and of walls separating ethnic groups from each other and from the 'host' society. Yet the evidence for Australia, a quintessentially immigrant country suggests we have the lowest levels of ethnic group segregation among OECD countries. This project uses an innovative methodology developed by the authors to assess and compare change over time and place to test the validity of ideas about the uniqueness of the Australian experience urban ethnic group experience in our multicultural society.

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